It’s morbid to compare: GM 124; Hospitals 400,000

Outraged over auto deaths?

Mary Barra in front of congress.
Mary Barra in front of congress.

All human life matters and to my way of thinking it’s good the autos and government have a way to track responsibility. I live in Detroit so that makes me a car guy. I feel attached to the auto industry. It’s good the cars we drive are safe.

Outrage over car deaths, of course, makes sense. And, the autos have taken responsibility because the government has a good method to enforce the autos to be accountable to the public.

General Motors will pay $900 million to settle criminal charges related to its flawed ignition switch that has been tied to at least 124 deaths.

CNNMoney (New York) September 17, 2015: 2:46 PM ET;  “GM CEO: ‘People died in our cars’ ” Poppy Harlow

http://money.cnn.com/2015/09/17/news/companies/gm-recall-ignition-switch/

Let’s compare; outrage over 124 auto related deaths compared to more than 400,000 preventable deaths at hospitals? Where’s the outrage? Where’s accountability?

Screen Shot 2015-09-18 at 5.52.25 AM
Healthcare IT news aritcle,

 

In this article, congress talks about possible solutions but isn’t demanding accountability from our medical system.

“The tragedy that we’re talking about here (is) deaths taking place that should not be taking place,” said subcommittee Chair Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., in his opening remarks.

Healthcare IT News, Erin McCann “Deaths by medical mistakes hit records, the way IT is designed remains part of the problem.” WASHINGTON | July 18, 2014

http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/deaths-by-medical-mistakes-hit-records

When I talk about our medical system is broken, it’s clear that if the auto tracking method were applied to hospitals we’d have accountability.

Here’s a quote from the same article;

In the hearing’s closing questions, when Sanders inquired as to why this crisis was not constantly splashed across front page news, he was met with this: “When people go to the hospital, they are sick. It is very easy to confuse the fact that somebody might have died because of a fatal consequence of their disease, versus they died from a complication from a medical error,” Jha said. “It has taken a lot to prove to all of us that many of these deaths are not a natural consequence of the underlying disease. They are purely failures of the system.”

In our premiums and in our government run healthcare we pay for these services.

But, our system requires more fixes than just this. The white paper is breaking apart many pieces of the medical system apparatus in order to demonstrate the areas where the system is broken. Follow the white paper for what’s wrong, then we’ll be publishing the fixes in 1qtr 2016.